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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!





No Holds Barred in Austin Meade’s Latest Video

Austin Meade lays down a feel-good, summer vibe in his latest video “Lying to Myself.” Meade seamlessly encompasses multiple genres and eras of music — think 80’s anthem rock, late 90’s alternative in the Everclear/Silverchair vein and modern Americana artists like Shakey Graves or The Avett Brothers in the vocals. That being said, the groove remains simple throughout the track, and the uplifting mood is accompanied perfectly by a comical video, featuring clown costumes, juggling and pissed off women. 

 

The guitar tones and straightforward drum beats a la Def Leppard or Whitesnake immediately solidify a stadium rock atmosphere. Yet Meade’s laid-back vocal style delivers a smooth contrast to the instrumental. On top of all of this, Meade adds his unique Americana twang to give the track a modern feel, despite some of the other vintage elements that are occurring. “Lying to Myself” exemplifies Meade’s ability to channel many different influences while maintaining a sound that is fresh and original. 

 

The silliness on display in the music video seems to only elevate the liveliness of the song. The video tells the story of a guy — presumably recently heartbroken — wandering around, attempting to pick up an attractive female. Throughout his escapade, he gets his foot stomped, a drink poured on his face and his groin area punched. One could simply interpret these events as a man pathetically trying to rebound from a lost love by mindlessly pursuing other women, but a deeper message may be present underneath this obvious analysis — the male actor is experiencing a loneliness that is relatable to anyone who has experienced a painful breakup. Towards the end of the video, the guy is on stage with the band and they’re dressed up in clown costumes, signifying that not taking life too seriously and enjoying things as much as possible are the only ways to move forward sometimes. 

 

Austin Meade’s “Lying to Myself” showcases his fluid songwriting and crisp vocals, all while reminding us that life is too short to dwell on the past. The Texas based musician possesses a mature sound that is uniquely his own, and we should all be excited to see what his future holds.

 

- Quinn Donaghue


 

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Mechanical Meets Bestial on Slam Death Metal Release "Born Into Darkness"

Fetid Bowel Infestation is a one-man, electronic metal outfit whose new album, “Born Into Darkness,” provides a gruesome addition to the slam and brutal death metal lineage. Flying in the face of the cliché that metal is the modern equivalent to classical music, Fetid Bowel Infestation comes from the lineage of brutal death metal that crawled from the primordial ooze, saw the virtuosic sweep-picking, finger-tapping guitarists and mechanically precise percussionists and shuffled back into the water to embrace a more chugging, more odious take on the genre.

 

The band bears comparison to Devourment’s classic slam death metal, with the electronic elements reminding me of German cybergrind outfit Libido Airbag. At times a bit of Mortician’s more neanderthalic tendencies creep in, though mostly by virtue of the synthetic drumming. The music is uniformly dank and sludgy, giving the whole album the claustrophobic ambiance of a damp, muggy catacomb. All of this might sound negative, but words like “disgusting” and “gruesome” are high praise for an album like this.

 

“Bathing in the Blood of Angels” begins with an atmospheric soundscape that suddenly gives way and thrusts the listener into the album. Downtuned guitars laden with distortion (HM-2 perhaps?) form a dense sonic jungle, while unnaturally low gutturals drench track after track. Throughout the album — as on the track “Wrath of Cerberus” — the meticulousness of the drum programming shows, with tasty fills and varied beats cutting through the swampish music like a machete. At times the drums even reminded me of the cybergrind flourishes one would hear on Agoraphobic Nosebleed’s “Agorapocalypse'.'

 

The electronic instrumentation and animalistic vocals work together to create a sound that is both mechanical and bestial. This is most evident on “Ancient Corpse Exhumed,” which employs screeches as well as the grunts and low growls that one hears throughout the album; all this over a precise, double-kicked rhythm section. The effect is at times dizzying, and almost always feels like a caveman bashing your head with a leg-bone. All in all, if you’re a fan of slam and brutal death metal “Born Into Darkness” is a disgusting delight.

 

- Tín Rodriguez

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Party Music for the (Hopefully Soon) Post-Pandemic

Looking much more like Matthew Sweet or other jangle pop hipsters with his sleek black outfits and his neatly styled light brunette hair (no cowboy hat/no facial hair) than the country music performer that he is, native Austin singer-songwriter and guitarist Terry McBride possesses a strong sense of his unique self. In the crowded and competitive country music genre, his new 3-song single containing live versions of songs from his 2020 album “Rebels & Angels” is bound to make a splash. 

For starters, his credentials simply out-rock everyone else’s: at various times, he’s both a bass and a lead guitarist, the luminaries he’s toured with include Jimmy Dale Gilmore, Rosie Flores and Delbert McClinton and he’s written hits with Brooks & Dunn, George Strait, Reba McEntire and other stars from 1995 throughout the 2000’s. For Brooks & Dunn alone, he has co-written 25 tunes! And he’s not emceeing the CMT award show every damn year??

 

Thing is, with the exception of some all-too short years with his cult-status band McBride & The Ride, Terry McBride has been content behind the scenes, always the bridesmaid and never the bride. However a listen to “Terry McBride: Live At The Castle” reveals that his credentials supporting other musical celebrities do indeed translate onto his first solo album last year and now his first live tunes single this year. 

 

McBride’s sense of humor and overall upbeat music and lyrics got a lot of practice and became part of his identity when he wrote songs with Brooks & Dunn. Can you say “ah-oooh-oooh/play me some country” from Brooks & Dunn’s “Play Me Some Country”? Yes he co-wrote that smash hit, a song that ranks up there with John Anderson’s “Swinging” as one of the funniest country tunes ever. On McBride’s “She Shows Up”, he approaches the situation of a break up in a small town with a wry raucousness that says loud and clear that the party must go on. If you like fast country dance songs such as “Sold” and “1, 2 Many”, or if you like swing dance/rockabilly at the bar, “She Shows Up” will impress.

 

McBride’s live version of his “Calling All Hearts” keeps it simple: the ex-girlfriend (“the only one I got at the bar”) whom he had lived with ghosted him. His maturity as well as his sense of fun just shine through on the song.

 

Judging from the three-song single, Terry McBride’s upcoming solo shows — as well as the McBride & The Ride reunion shows scheduled across various Texas towns — should be a great way to roar out of quarantine and let off steam now that music fans are getting vaccinated.

 

- Jill Blardinelli

 

McBride’s website features his tour schedule, which starts this Friday at Royse City’s Southern Junction.

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